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True Femininity: How to be a Heroine



With a recent viewing of the 1995 Pride and Prejudice fresh in my mind, and my thoughts still bent on wondering how it would feel to be Lizzy Bennet, I thought now was as good a time as any to do my "How To Be A Heroine" post. :)

Who has not watched a movie and sat through the end credits, wishing and dreaming that she was Elizabeth Bennet, or Jo March, or Emma Woodhouse or a score of other heroines?

I've noticed a trend in the blogging world of using popular heroines' names as a screen=n
ame.
So what is it that makes up a heroine that is laudable, worthy of imitation, and unforgettable?
How can we become such a young lady?
Here are some of my thoughts on the subject:



A heroine is beautiful-- I am a bit reluctant to address this
subject, as the whole self-image thing can be an issue for many girls. There are two sides to the beauty subject. I will address the less important side, that of outward beauty, first.
Each heroine makes the most of her beauty, however much she has. And believe me. There is some beauty to be found even in the plainest of faces. A young lady ought to be careful to dress herself tastefully and neatly, without a bunch of extra feathers and furbellows
.
This is not what we're looking for, although it has it's place, I suppose.

Ahh! Much better! Beautifully feminine and simple all the same.

Every girl, regardless of her natural features can take pains to make the most of her temple and prepare herself sweetly and modestly for the day. And remember girls, the girl who smiles is always the most beautiful! :)

Now for the second, and more important, side of beauty. A heroine is always a girl who has strength of character, nobility, and a sweetness about her that blesses everyone she comes in contact with. She is cherished, not because she is outwardly beautiful, but because she is a heroine in every sense of the word.
A heroine is a lady: I cannot stress the importance of this one aspect of a heroine. Before I go further, I must tell you that a guy will not act like a hero unless the girl is a lady and lets him act heroically. If a girl is out to prove herself all the time and charges forward in life, leaving all she passes breathless, the guys will steer far away, relieved to have escaped her steam-roller attitude.
So, what does ladylike-ness look like in a heroine? Well, if you notice, a heroine typically is not a Lydia Bennet. In other words, a flirt.
Such a girl who flaunts herself and fills the air with senseless chatter only to elicit laughter and attention from the guys will never end up with a hero. She might catch a Wickham, though.

Ahem.

A heroine who is a lady is socially graceful. She knows what to say and when to say it.
One of the things I admire in other young ladies and am striving to cultivate in myself is the ability to make real conversation with ease, to have substantial conversations with people, and to have a ready and thoughtful answer to give when required.
"A girl of sense is infinitely preferable to a sensible man...."
Truly. It is not the flirtatious, cavorting girls who are the respected, well-loved sisters in Christ.
If you are a Lydia Bennet, you will have the attention of Wickham, but miss out on the regard and honor bestowed on the true heroines by the Mr. Darcy's of this world.

A heroine thinks of others above herself.
I think of Molly Gibson in Wives and Daughters who was constantly giving of herself to others, even when the situation was awkward, and it cost her her reputation. This is another treasure of a heroine. She is always indispensable to her family, friends, and community. :)

A heroine is accomplished and productive.
The heroines we all love best are full of spunk, creativity, and profitable ventures. Who can help admiring and loving a girl who keeps busy and cheerful doing productive things? :) And for many heroes out there, this is one of the most attractive things about the heroines.




A heroine, in short, is a truly womanly woman. She brings out the most manly side of the men and the most beautiful side of her fellow women. She does not put herself out to have all the attention, but says things worth saying, listens to others, and is dependable, graceful, beautiful, kind, accomplished, sweet, and patient. I think we could all use to take the example of the Lizzy and Jane Bennets, the Emma Woodhouses, the Molly Gibsons, and try our best to be true heroines. :) It isn't easy, but I think the world needs a few girls who are determined to be heroines, don't you? ~Rachel

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